Post Bacc: Week Two: I love you in the present tense.

So, I had read John Green’s Looking for Alaska, and The Fault in Our Stars a little bit ago after re-visiting my neighborhood library. And it was probably the worst thing ever, given that books like that are not something I out of all people ought to be reading. But, I got a lot of beautiful things out of it, even if parts were a little cheesy and predictable. Plus, it got me to thinking/dwelling on concepts of temporality and permanence, which of course I am majorly dwelling on this week/always.

Looking for Alaska:
Those awful things are survivable, because we are as indestructible as we believe ourselves to be.

“We need never be hopeless, because we can never be irreparably broken. We think that we are invincible because we are. We cannot be born, and we cannot die. Like all energy, we can only change shapes and sizes and manifestations. But that part of us greater than the sum of our parts cannot begin and cannot end, and so it cannot fail.”

“WE ARE ALL GOING”

The Fault in Our Stars:
“I’m in love with you, and I’m not in the business of denying myself the simple pleasure of saying true things. I’m in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we’re all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we’ll ever have, and I am in love with you.”

“There are infinite numbers between 0 and 1. There’s .1 and .12 and .112 and an infinite collection of others. Of course, there is a bigger infinite set of numbers between 0 and 2, or between 0 and a million. Some infinities are bigger than other infinities. A writer we used to like taught us that. There are days, many of them, when I resent the size of my unbounded set. I want more numbers than I’m likely to get, and God, I want more numbers for Augustus Waters than he got. But, Gus, my love, I cannot tell you how thankful I am for our little infinity. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. You gave me a forever within the numbered days, and I’m grateful.”

“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”

Anyways, this is why you shouldn’t let me read.
Best,
MP

Title: John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars

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